Health

Breast cancer deaths have dropped by 40% in the last 30 years, but progress is slowing

Over the last three decades, breast cancer related deaths have dropped by 40% in the U.S.

However, new statistics show that this progress has started to slow down in the last few years.

Breast cancer deaths have dropped by 40% in the last 30 years, but progress is slowing down

Breast cancer deaths have dropped by 40% in the last 30 years, report finds

According to the American Cancer Society report, breast cancer killed 40% less Americans in 2017 than it did in 1989.

Thanks to mammograms, breast cancer awareness, checks, chemo and a variety of testing, doctors have been able to catch breast cancer sooner rather than later.

Breast cancer deaths have dropped by 40% in the last 30 years, but progress is slowing down

Although the report reveals that since in 2004, the number of women diagnosed with the disease has risen by 0.3% each year.

Experts believe obesity could be the reason for this rise.

“We can’t say for sure what the reasons are for the slowing of the decline in breast cancer mortality,” said Carol DeSantis, lead author of the report. 

‘“It could be due in part to the slight increase in incidence since 2004, as well as a sign that optimal breast cancer treatment has become more widespread, particularly among white women.

“However, more can and should be done to ensure that all women have access to quality care to help eliminate disparities and further reduce breast cancer mortality.”

Between 2016 and 17, cancer surpassed lung cancer as the most deadly form of the disease for black women in the states of Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi and South Carolina.

Breast cancer deaths have dropped by 40% in the last 30 years, but progress is slowing down

Other significant findings from the report:

  • As of the beginning of 2019, there were more than 3.8 million women with a history of breast cancer living in the United States.

 

  • Between 2012 and 2016, breast cancer rates increased among Asians/Pacific Islanders (1.5% per year), American Indians/Alaska Natives (0.8% per year), and blacks and whites (both 0.5% per year), but were relatively stable among Hispanic/Latina women.

 

  • The lifetime risk of a breast cancer diagnosis is now rounded to 13% (12.8%; previously 12.4%), which still equates to about 1 in 8 women diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime.

 

  • The ten-year probability of a breast cancer diagnosis is highest for women in their 70s (4%), whereas the 10-year risk of breast cancer death is highest in women in their 80s (1%).

Check your breast health

Breast cancer deaths have dropped by 40% in the last 30 years, but progress is slowing down

Being aware of changes in your breasts and understanding the signs and symptoms of breast cancer could help save your life.

Don’t forget the American Cancer Society is your go-to place in regards to breast help.

It has a range of resources and information that can help you learn the possible signs of breast cancer.

If you have any concerns, we advise you see your doctor as soon as possible.

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